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>>> on the broadcast tonight from washington -- ready to strike. the u.s. prepare as military attack on syria, but tonight the house speaker tells the president to slow down. we'll take a closer look at the possible consequences of american military action. >>> remembering the dream. 50 years after dr. king's historic speech, a huge crowd comes here to celebrate, remember and inspire the nation to finish the job. >>> death sentence for the army psychiatrist convicted in the massacre at fort hood. >>> and air scare. a new warning tonight about the wildfire at yosemite and what it's doing to the air people are breathing so many miles away. "nightly news" begins now. >>> and good evening. i'm lester holt in for brian. here in washington, talk of war and peace at the lincoln memorial where martin luther king jr. delivered his famous "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago today. president obama headlined a chorus of speakers saluting the racial justice that changed this country. a lot more on that in a few minutes. >>> but first, the remmings in this city about a possible military at
speaking, turkey, saudi arabia and cutter. >> washington and london compared to -- prepared for possible strikes against serial -- serious military targets. >> let's go now to washington and our correspondent there. what is the latest you are hearing about how the talks have been going in the u.n.? >> russia and china did not back the draft resolution, condemning their use of chemical weapons by the assad regime and asking for permission to take all necessary measures to protect civilians. the draft resolution would authorize force to protect civilians from chemical weapons. it was not a big surprise, at least not for me. after a meeting in the security council, the ambassadors in france and the united kingdom came together in a meeting behind closed doors and now they are consulting with governments in paris, london and washington. i don't expect any u.n. resolution today or tomorrow. >> the british foreign secretary says talks at the u.n. need to go on for a few more days. does that mean an imminent attack is off the table? >> i don't think this is true. i think the americans and briti
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
on washington. i am proud to stand before you as the first african-american, first woman city administrator. >> [applause] >>thank you. i i am grateful to be inspired and mentored by many great civil rights leaders and my educational leaders which includes usf law school. >> [applause] >> and my family members who have mentored me and have paved the way for me along my career path. i could not have gotten there without them. my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i want to talk about howthey were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin they were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin luther king on the march on washington 50 years ago and stood up for the rights for freedom.as a teenager growing up in washington as a teenager growing up in
gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement the were given their proper due. >> we begin with syria, and how an attack that seemed eminent may be less so now. president obama it is he hasn't yet decided to take action. while britain, france and turkey are open to military intervention, the u.n. and arab league are far from a consensus. as we report, ave
decades ago in front of majestic lincoln memorial in washington dc. the march on washington was an assemblage of people in power converging on washington dc, our nations capital, only occasionally seen every few decades. a quarter of 1 million americans march on washington that hot summer day. each representing thousands and thousands of americans were standing up for both racial equality and job opportunities. across the nation. now i will defer to our main speaker, the man who is there and whose words you will soon hear them up but this was the largest public gathering in washington dc until that time in our nations history. only surpassed by some of the antiwar marches that followed later in the 60s. african-americans, teachers, students, union workers, 30 of all creeds and people of many walks of life, came together to appeal to the conscience of the nation and demand action that would enable the patient to live up to our constitutional ideals. that would free african-americans from the shackles of poverty and discrimination and free all of us from the reality of segrega
. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the t
the new york time yesterday and also washington post and as you said, a lot of social media and other important media in the western world -- >> it's getting worse. the problem is that they are not even that sophisticated, i mean, in fact, we saw how -- we know that some of them are what we call -- they do not launch complex attacks, but those attacks are out there launching and working. that's my big concern now. >> we've heard for years that cyber attacks could take out power grids, financial markets, banks and officials have done drills and simulated attacks. we're going to show you one called cyber shock wave, produced by the bipartisan policy center, including a whole officials. >> the country's internet system is now slowing down to a virtual crawl. communications with financial trading houses are almost at a stand still. >> it is an active war. you turn off everybody's cell phone, you don't allow them to bank, work, communicate be this is an attack on the united states. it may not be a bomb, but it's much more significant than a bomb going off. >> scary simulation there. what s
were also in washington today to mark this anniversary. >> when i look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, i seemed to realize what otis redding is talking about, and what dr. king preached about, this moment has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> now, it is time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell, thank you for joining us, have a great night. >>> 50 years ago tonight, reporters filing stories on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and y thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at th
on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at the wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. >> martin luther king jr. did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political grid lock. >> the arc may have bent towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. >> for all who are willing to take the flame for justice, i know that flame remains. the tired teacher, the businessman, they are marching. >> we knew fear. the sound of the bells today. let freedom ring everywhere we g
, that change does not come from washington. but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship. you are marching. and that is the lesson of our past. that is the promise of tomorrow. governor martin o'malley, democrat from maryland. and congresswoman marsha fudge, democrat from ohio and the chair of the congressional black caucus. thank you both for coming on tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> governor o'malley, a powerful day, first of all. >> it was tremendous. >> and there is work to do. >> absolutely. and a lot of this work is happening in states and sadly some of the examples are states that are going backwards. but there's other states like my own state of maryland where even in this recession, we've done the things that advance the cause of justice that are also good for creating jobs. we were named by the u.s. chamber number one for innovation and entrepreneurship and we also have the highest minority business goals. highest womens -- number of women-owned firms starting new business. t
, martin luther king junior delivered his legendary dream speech in washington. it was a battle cry for liberty and justice for all. it changed the course of our history. king would have been 84 years old had he lived to this day. he would have been able to witness the nation's first african-american president standing on those same steps he did in 1963. here is president obama commemorating dr. king's dream and his lasting legacy this afternoon. >> on a hot summer day they assembled here in our nation's capital under the shadow of the great emancipator. everyone that realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day that change does not come from washington but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship, you are marching. that's the lesson of our past. that's the promise of tomorrow. >> okay, bob, you were particularly moved by this speech as you were by dr. king's speech so many years, 50 years ago. >> yeah. i think if dr. king had been alive today, listened to these tributes, i think he would have
>> rose: welcome to the program. august 28, 2013, marks 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the famous speech by dr. martin luther kino congressman johning with, who with dr. king. progress. back in 1963, charlie, let me tell you, i s that said white waing, colored waiting, those signs are gone. we passed the civil rights bill. we passed the voting right act, the fair housing act. and when people say to me nothing has checked. i say come dalk in my scooz. >> we talk with jonathan rider, isabelle wilkerson, and clarence jones. >> the march was nmy view, the culminn ofio 100 years of frustration and despair. 1963 began with the centennial, the 100th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. and that means that when these people came together, those quarter of a million people came together, they were in some ways representing all the hopes and dreams that had idea yt to be fulfull fulfilled. >> rose: the 50th anniversary of the march on washington next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we be
th anniversary of the march on washington. [applause] >> 50 years ago there was not a single woman on the program. today we are honored to have not just one young person but several young people on the program today. it is certainly a tribute to the work and legacy of so many people that have gone on before us. 50 years ago today, in a symbolic shadow of abraham lincoln my father stood in this very spot and declared to this nation his dream to let freedom ring all the people being manacled by a system of discrimination. he commissioned us to go back to our various cities, towns, hamlets, states and villages and let freedom ring. the reverberation of the sound of that freedom message has amplified and echoed since 1963 through the decades and coast to coast throughout this nation and even around the world. and as we are summoned again back to these hallowed grounds to send out a clarion call to let freedom ring. since that time, as a result of the civil rights act of 1964, voting rights act of 1965, the fair housing act of 1968, we have witnessed great strides toward freedom for al
material, in connection with the speech he gave on the march on washington, i had provided him with a summary of ideas and summary of language that he had previously discussed. so it wasn't as if i was providing him with some creative ideas that were solely mine. i was more like a secretary who was summarizing and putting in the form that could be used for the speech, the opening paragraphs, little did i know, until i was sitting listening to him, i was standing some 50 feet behind him, when i was listening very carefully, i said, oh, my god, i guess he decided to use those opening paragraphs. to those paragraphs, which constituted the first seven paragraphs. to those opening paragraphs, he seemlessly added his own additional paragraphs, and it was when he was speaking his own additional paragraphs that he was interrupted from the written speech that he had prepared. and he was interrupted by mahalia jackson who shouted to him, tell him about the dream, martin. tell him about the dream. most people don't know that the speech which is so frequently celebrated over the years, the
on washington? >> the purpose of it was jobs. but what was behind that and what was the revelation for me was how much and everything dr. king did was really all about education. was all about education. he was locked in on that and when that group went into the white house and talked with the president, president kennedy said and this is reported by brandt, that the kind of influence you have in the black community you really ought to emphasize schools and getting your kids to do well in schools. >> i am struck mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cov
". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voic
know, with iraq and the attacks on the terrorist targets. it's the way washington is unfortunately. that those leaks come out. i guess it's part and parcel of the way our open government works and the nature of what happened in d.c. >> thank you, general, for joining us this morning. in our next hour we'll talk about the u.s. options in syria with the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. senator men nen doesendez will join us. >>> a military jury needed just two hours yesterday to decide on a death sentence for major hasan, the ft. hood gunman. he admitted killing 13 people and did not defend himself at his trial. he said he acted to protect islamic fighters overseas. he will be the first american soldier to be executed in more than 50 years. >>> firefighters in california's syriaear sierra nevada are gaining ground this morning on the rim fire in yosemite national park. video shows just how big this fire is. yesterday, the flames forced park officials to close the main entrance on yosemite's east side. the fire is now 30% contained this morning.
, straight-forward news". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. make sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. saudi arabia for that. ♪ test test .. . .. . but should you be made aware if you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." welcome back to al jazeera. members of congress are being briefed right now about syria. >> possibly to start the end of this week, about now. now things look so very different. the loyal britt whose have stood by the americans in iraq, and afghanistan will not be onboard, this time. so obama has to decide, i think, whether to go it alone with perhaps the support of the french. and it looks like there's no way he is going to have a u.n. security council mandate. i think part of the parliamentary debat
anniversary of the march on washington. david martin and holly williams on the countdown to an attack on syria. scientists discover a brain protein that improves memory. dr. jon lapook has the study. a cbs news poll out tonight reveals how much america is changing on race. and memories of the march from the foot soldiers who were there. icons of civil rights on what is left to be done. >> the future is in your hands, in your heart, in your mind. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from washington. ing tonight from wash >> pelley: good evening. today the president commemorated one momentous event-- the march on washington-- as he contemplated another: a possible military strike on syria. we're going to start tonight with the 50th anniversary of the march and dr. martin luther king's i have a dream speech. president obama stood as dr. king did at the lincoln memorial and addressed a crowd of thousands gathered on the national mall. he paid tribute to those who had marched a half century earlier demanding jobs and freedom. >> on the battl
. >> brown: and we continue our look at the legacy of the march on washington 50 years on. tonight, reflections on the challenges ahead for martin luther king's vision for a multi-racial democracy. >> 40% of whites don't have friends outside of their own race. so in some ways we're still as segregated as we were 50 years ago and i think that king would be very concerned about that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the united states worked today to firm up the intelligence behind claims that syria used chemical weapons and to win support fo
, steve. >> reporter: good evening. organizers say 100,000 people came here to washington today, most including president obama believe we have come a long way in our nation. it is still divided by race but nowhere near as badly as we were when dr. martin luther king jr. delivered his speech here in washington in 1963. 50 years later marching in washington again was ducky burris. less emotional this time. >> now i'm 77. >> reporter: is it because things are better now? >> things are better in some areas. >> reporter: half a century later on this day as the crowd gathered in the rain at the lincoln memorial only 54% of americans believe the dream has been achieved. only 21% of african-americans do. congressman john lewis is the sole surviving speaker from '63. >> 50 years later we can ride anywhere we want to ride, we can say what we want to say. those lines that say whites and colored are gone. >> reporter: all eyes were on america's first black president. barack obama did not descend from slaves but to many he is a realization of king's dream. >> because they marched city councils ch
. >>> to washington d -- dc here is what the capitol looks leak bathed in light with no one around. quite different from 10 hours ago. a bell tolled at exactly 3:00 eastern time to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington and martin luther king, junior's legendary "i have a dream" speech. tens of thousands of people converge owed the capitol to take part. president obama celebrated people who work every day to keep king's dream alive. >> everyone who realizes the glorious patriots knew on that day that change does not come from washington, but to washington. change has always been built on our willingness. we, the people who take on the citizenship, you are marching. >> martin luther king, junior's granddaughter stole the show today. yolanda kept her cool as the president took a moment to talk with her. before that she helped ring the bell that you just havered -- you just heard a moment ago. >>> from 50 years ago in washington to more than 70 years ago in the bay area, take a look at what some of our abc7 news viewers found in the wall of their home as they were undergoing a con
's march on washington, but did you know the full name of the historic event 50 years ago was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. are we better off today than we were back then? some shocking stats for you upon my return. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me t
. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. ask yourself, would abraham lincoln be a republican in 2013? would the man sitting up in that chair yesterday be invited to join the party of the birth errs, nullifiers and talkers of succession? just ask yourself in a lineup of ted cruz, rick perry and michele bachmann, and the great emancipator, who would be the odd man out? the reason the republican party wasn't represented yesterday at the king reunion at the lincoln memorial is that the republican party no more longer represents abraham lincoln. its real leader today would be jefferson davis or george wallace or strom thurmond, or some other character in the long list of null fires and obstructionists and states righters. can you imagine the reaction of tom paul had he been alive at the time of the emancipation proclamation? please don't ask. can you imagine to rick perry's claim that texas has the right to succeed from the unionany time it phil feels like it. the values of abraham lincoln, the belief in a strong federal government, the paramount right of h
on washington, i pay tribute to the visionary organizer of the original march by rustin. as a fellowship of reconciliation staff, rustin co- founded and organized the first freedom ride in 1947. an african-american gay man, rustin was a quaker. his life commitment to nonviolence as a spiritual discipline exemplifies that pacifism is anything but passive. he pursuit -- refused to accept more by denying society's expectations that he be straight. he refused to be at war with another nation by being in prison as a conscientious objector during world war ii, and he refused to be at war with humanity by not accepting diminishment or division based on race. in every situation, rustin rejected violence, conflicts, and strife, and instead showed peace. he and rev. james lawson, another staffer, are credited with convincing rev. dr. king early on that nonviolence had to be the path to freedom. and so, on this day, how can we pay tribute to this legacy of nonviolence and peace, to dr. king's refusal to see another as enemy, as we are poised to attack syria? rustin and king showed us, over and over
'm chris matthews in washington. the content of his character. remember that great line in martin luther king's speech? remember how he offered the hope that his four little children as he put it would some day be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character? have we reached that day? have we? is that how people of color are judged today? is that how the president of the united states has been judged? by the content of his character? i wish. you may wish. he must wish. barack obama the man has led a remarkable life. he excelled in school. he climbed to the ivy league and made editor of the harvard law review in a blind test that has nothing to do with affirmative action. nothing. he has led an unblemished life, has been a solid faithful husband, a loving caring father to his daughters. his political flaw is that he spends too many evenings with his family and not enough time caging and winning over the follow politicians. he's too much the stay at home husband. and what has been the judgment of the right wing? have they said a single word of good about this
in atlanta. she has been in washington for all the events and joins us tonight from washington. good to have you on this program. sense of how you have felt throughout these honoring the event and your father. you always want the person back with you. in that vein it has been exciting, because it speaks to of thenitude contribution he made that we are here looking at and talking about that time that was so and able to andbrate the progress recognize we have so much to do. thoughtsat are your about your mother and your for thist being around celebration? and foremost my father talked about his four little children. there are only three of us left. that void is very much felt. i say all the time martin luther king is different from the martin luther king today, and i to my mother, whose tireless efforts to keep his legacy alive, and perhaps we celebrating,n be because it was 1983, and every five years there was an so iersary remembrance, think about her, because we are here in many respects, and she cannot forget the tremendous contributions, and we cannot forget there is so much work to .o th
action. tonight chief washington correspondent james rosen tells us the prospect is not an easy sell overseas either. >> reporter: for british prime minister david cameron sudden and stiff resistance to the uk's participation for its alleged chemical weapons use. >> the question is what if any military action we should take and what criteria should determine that decision. >> it is not because of the weapons but because the american president foolishly drew a red line. and because of his position now he is going to attack or face humiliati humiliation. >> let's not pretend there is one smoking piece of intelligence to solve the problem. >> it is not about invading or regime change. to me the biggest danger escalation is if the world community stands back and does nothing. i think assad will draw very clear conclusions from that. >> reporter: u.s. officials indicated a willingness to move without downing. >> we would not necessarily act on the same basis of the same legal doctrines of our allies. we also said the president will make a decision and act on any response on our own timeli
allies won't be able to take part in any key action for some time. >> i'm joined now from washington by the former u.s. ambassador to n.a.t.o. welcome. >> thank you, good to be here. >> it appeared there was a move to slow down the united states today. was it successful? >> well, i'm not sure that the united states was in a hurry, so i'm not sure that it's a move to slow down the united states. there is obviously a lot of jockeying for position going on. i think there are several things worth clarifying. one of them is what the facts are. that we have a preponderance in belief that the syrian government was responsible for the attacks, the belief is in the u.k. and france. however, we don't have the support from the u.n. and everyone wants that to have a wider understanding of what happened. the second is the role of the united nations security council. everyone would like to have a security council resolution. the problem that we have is not that people are seeking to use force or that the u.n. security council is being asked, it's that russia in particular is standing in the way of
a man who spearheaded the civil rights movement. 50 years ago in washington martin luther king delivered a speech in washington. he uttered the words "i have a dream." thousands gathered at the lincoln memorial at the national mall 50 years on. president obama was joined by bill clinton and jimmy carter. obama said king and other civil rights leadee local assemblieses, congress and even the white house. but he also expressed concern for the nation's economic disparities that are widening, not shrinking. >> as always has been noted, black unemployment has remained almost twice as high as white unemployment. latino unemployment close behind. the gap in wealth between races has not lessened, it's grown. >> opinion polls suggest that 79% of african-americans say the country still has a long way to go before it achieves a society free of racial prejudices. >>> i have a dream w those words martin luther king jr. inspired people everywhere to join him in his quest for equal rights for all. 50 years after the speech, people continued to reflect on the importance of his vision. the reverend dr. m
, following his speech at the lincoln memorial today, 50 years after the march on washington. >> no one can match king's brilliance but the same flame can light the heart of all who are willing to take a first step towards justice. i know that flame remains. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: there was a flurry of activity around the world today on what happens next in syria. at the united nations, britain submitted a resolution to the security council condemning syria for an alleged chemical attack, and authorizing the use of force in response. the u.n. envoy to syria, lakhdar brahimi, warned any military action mu
and house members on syrian intelligence tomorrow in washington. officials were expected to lay out plans for military action against the assad regime. the head of the meeting, it is important that lawmakers ask tough questions of the president. for example, both iran and syria will attack israel if the u.s. launches a military attack. if it happens, how will the administration respond? will they help our closest ally in the region? finally, what is the end game if assad's regime is toppled? is there a possibility al qaeda-related elements may, in fact, take charge of the country? president george w. bush was hounded by the press over these questions. if he had to answer, so should barack obama. here in stud quo is fox news channel's own colonel oliver north. his new book out in paperback today. >> it is a must read for barack obama. he needs to read this one. it's about a president who forgets about 9/11. guess what's three weeks away? >> my concern is, first of all, this has been going on for 30 months. 100,000 killed. >> over 100,000 dead. over 250,000 wounded. 2.3 million people in re
on washington and one of the most historic speeches of all time. dr. martin luther king jr. 's i have a dream speech. president obama was among the thousands who gathered on the national mall in washington to honor those who marched and thought for civil rights. here in the bay area, kron 4's haaziq madyun caught up with someone who was there for the original gathering and marched back in 1963. >> yes. >> reporter: you are look at a newspaper clipping photo of the legendary former oakland parts and recks supervisor paterson. taken when he was at the historic march on washington. >> king was a catalyst. >> reporter: on this 50th anniversary of king's i have a dream speech, patterson reflects on being there that monumental day. >> you think all these folk are going to washington. am i going to go to? nothing kept me back. >> reporter: nothing held back patterson who developed such great oakland sports luminaries like kirk flood and bill russell. always inspiring others, however, patterson says it was king who inspired him as he it is on the board of directors on the east bay municipal utility d
on washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history. that we are masters of our fate. but it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. >> the numbers were much smaller, an estimated 30,000 compared to the record quarter million who gathered 50 years ago for one of the most important speeches in american history. >> we can never be satisfied as long as our children are ripped of their self-hood and dignity, by signs that state "whites only". >> most politicians stayed away. not this time. >> martin luther king jr. urged his crowd not to drink from the cup of bitterness, but to reach across the racial divide because he said, we cannot walk alone. their destiny is tied up with our destiny, they freedom is bound to our freedom. >> and i think we all know how dr. king would have reacted to have more than 835,000 african american men in prison, five times as many as when i left office. and with one third of all african american males being destined to be in prison in their lifetimes. >> reporter: the stories of ordinary people
overnight hours into tomorrow we'll see showers into oregon and washington state. little change in our condition around the bay tomorrow, moving on to the area of rim fire, groveland rim fire forecast i should say, calls for sunny skies tomorrow. afternoon thunderstorm. warm down in the valley with highs about 95 degrees and cooler in high country. getting back to the bay area overnight tonight areas of low clouds and fog inland. south bay highs into 80s. 87 emergencian hill, temperatures up to 80 in redwood city. and mid to upper 60s on the coast. mid-80s in the north bay valleys from sonoma. eeflt bay highs 74 oakland. inland east bay highs upper 80s to near 90. here is the accu-weather forecast. warm again friday. warmer low 90s inland. temperatures tapering off saturday, sunday, monday. despite the drp will be a pleasant and mild weejd dr-weekend. >> coming up next more on the soon to open new bay bridge. >> and how it is becoming a shhhhh! in our day, we didn't have u-verse high speed internet. yeah, our babysitter didn't have a million ways to serve mom up on a silver platter. we
made in washington and agreed by the government here, then that's really why we're here, because washington feels there should be some bombs falling this weekend. now, many atrocities have taken place in the last two years since the conflict began. shirley, those seeking to take military action could wait a few days longer to assure that the facts are straight but it's obvious there's no threats to this journey of the uk that we know that the government seeks military action in order to deter and undermines chemical weapons, that's fine. that it may well see, that's fine, although military action has to be sanctioned by law. but surely, it should wait until the full conclusive proof is available their fight by the >> that has descended the civil war. the recent spill regarding militant objection has been confusing. last friday at united states and the uk governments were pressing for weapons inspectors to be allowed in c. on monday the inspector general's went albeit in difficult circumstances but on monday evening all indications were that the u.s. and uk had made up their minds
at barack obama and pointing fingers. why don't they call. why don't they come back to washington. why don't we come together? because right now president obama has three audiences. he does have the american people. but secondly, he has the congress of the united states, where in that constitution that ted cruz and the tea party folks want to keep citing, congress has the authority to declare war or these acts of war. not the president. so why isn't congress getting back in and figuring that out? and thirdly, the united nations security council. rev, we should call for an emergency national security meeting to get on the record russia and china where they're going to stand when these were crimes, when these weapons are used against women and children and are willing slaughtered, where are they when it comes down to the assad regime. >> and it's interesting, congressman schiff, when you have cruz saying trying to tie obama care and syria together and making some political point like the president is stepping over the bounds last time i looked, you're a member of congress, obama care is the
was recreated here in washington today. tens of thousands gathered in front of the lincoln memorial, quite an act of that famous day in 1963 when martin luther king jr. claimed he had a dream. the march on washington were not simply freedom and civil rights but also good jobs and fair wages. and today, president obama picked up on those same themes. >> what does a profit of a man dr. king would ask, to sit at an integrated lunch counter if he can't afford the meal. this idea that one's liberty is linked to one's livelihood. that the pursuit of happiness requires the dignity of work, the skills to find work, decent pay, some measure of material security, this idea was not new. lincoln himself understood the declaration of independence in such terms. as a promise that, in due time, the weight should be lifted from the shoulders of all men. and that all should have an equal chance. and dr. king explained that the goals of african americans were identical to working people of all races. decent wages, fair working conditions. livable housing. full aid and security, health and welfare measures,
do you need to see that equality and civil rights have marched to washington and america? >> it was a great day, this is no doubt about it. one couldn't be there or watch it on television, certainly as an african american and not be proud and inhale this historic moment. >> where is the butt, tavis? >> butt, butt, dr. king in his life talked about the triple threat, the three evils of racism, poverty and military ice m. i said the other day if you're not going to talk about racism, poverty and mithen why stand whe he stood to do justice to his legacy. today we had references, subtle references to racism and acknowledgement, finally, of poverty but daeafening silence. i didn't expect this president or any president, anybody whose the head of the american empire to talk about mill terrorism. if you dance around racism, poverty and milliterism. >> why do you think president obama is wary of going there? >> that's a question you would have to ask him. as far as i'm concerned, and said many times to you, racism is the most intractable. this country is 3% richer than 50 years a
anniversary. what more do you need to see that equality and civil rights have marched to washington and america? >> it was a great day. no doubt about it. one couldn't be there watch it on television, certainly as an african-american, i would be proud and not inhale this historic moment. it was a great day. >> where's the but. >> but dr. king and his wife talked about the triple threat. the three evils of racism, poverty and militaryism. i said the other day if you are not going to talk about racism, poverty an militaryism why stand where martin stood if you are trying to do justice to his legacy. today, we had references, subtle references to racism and acknowledgment, finally, of poverty. but daefenning silence on militarism. with syria looming as the backdrop, i didn't expect this president or any president who was the head of the american empire to talk about militarism but you are not doing justice to the life and slig of dr. king if you dance around racism, poverty and militarism. >> why do you think that president obama is ware of going there? >> that's a question you would h
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